Cache

Time:

  • 5pm and 8pm
  • April 14th, 2006

Where:

  • The Tower Theatre
  • 815 E. Olive Avenue, Fresno

Synopsis

Writer/director Michael Haneke delivers a masterpiece of unsettlement with Caché. Life seems perfect for Georges (Daniel Auteuil) and Anne (Juliette Binoche), a bourgeois Parisian couple who live in a comfortable home with their adolescent son, Pierrot (Lester Makedonsky). But when an anonymous videotape turns up on their doorstep, showing their house under surveillance from across the street, their calm life begins to spiral out of control. Subsequent videotapes arrive, accompanied by mysterious drawings, and gradually Georges becomes convinced that he’s being tormented by a figure from his past. But when he confronts him, the man assures Georges he is innocent. A growing sense of guilt begins to rise in Georges as he recalls his less-than-angelic childhood, yet for some reason he’s unable to be completely honest with Anne. Soon, their happy home is an emotional battleground, leading to a climax that is breathtaking in its ferocity and ambiguousness.

Though Haneke’s film works first and foremost as an insidious thriller, it is also a powerful commentary on the urban paranoia and racism that continue to permeate modern society. Without using a score, and keeping his camera detached and static, Haneke nonetheless establishes a nearly unbearable level of tension. Caché is a work of menacing brilliance, and was the winner of the Best Director award at the 2005 Cannes Film Festival.

Directed by Michael Haneke
2005, France
In French with English subtitles
Rated R, for brief strong violence
121 min.

Reviews

A thriller with a powerful political subtext.
Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
There’s a sense that Hitchcock is hovering in the background and cheering for Auteuil, who musters all his French superstardom to play a man having his mask of blandness torn off.
Lisa Schwarzbaum, Entertainment Weekly
Mr. Auteuil and Ms. Binoche are alternately graceful and scary as people pushed to the brink of madness through sheer duress, and the director does a tense job of capturing their panic as they drift from tranquility into chaos.
Rex Reed, New York Observer
A thriller with a powerful political subtext.
Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune
There’s a sense that Hitchcock is hovering in the background and cheering for Auteuil, who musters all his French superstardom to play a man having his mask of blandness torn off.
Lisa Schwarzbaum, Entertainment Weekly
Mr. Auteuil and Ms. Binoche are alternately graceful and scary as people pushed to the brink of madness through sheer duress, and the director does a tense job of capturing their panic as they drift from tranquility into chaos.
Rex Reed, New York Observer

Every second Friday of the month, Fresno Filmworks screens first-run independent and international movies at the historic Tower Theatre.